Open Energy Tools & Interoperability (Open Inverter, OpenTRV, Heat Pump Monitoring) – London 18/2/2016

The BCS OSSG and the OSHUG are hosting a talk on a topic which has been a recurring theme and of much interest at previous meetings, open energy platforms.

There will be talks on Open Inverter, OpenTRV, OpenEnergyMonitor and heat pump monitoring, with a focus also on interoperability. The evening meeting will also be preceded by an interoperability hack day for project contributors.

The event will be held on Thursday Thursday 18th February at BCS HQ – 1st Floor, The Davidson Building, 5 Southampton Street, London, WC2E 7HA, [map] from 6:00pm to 9:00pm.

This event is free to attend for both BCS Members and non-members but booking is required. Places are limited; please book as soon as possible.

Note: Please aim to arrive by 18:15 as the event will start at 18:30 prompt.

Low power DC conversion using open source hardware

WinNode5

The Open Inverter is a micro inverter designed to produce an AC power output of up to 250 VA. It uses modular, open source PCB designs for both it’s controller and power boards — and is extendible to larger power outputs or for other power electronics projects, such as battery charging, DC ring mains and DC power transformation using buck-boost DC/DC converters.

Open Inverter will provide an AC output from a single 250W photovoltaic panel, micro-hydro turbine. It also has applications in electric bike charging and DC power storage. The key PCBs are currently at either the layout or manufacture stage. The microcontroller board features an RFM69 low power wireless, making it compatible with the Open Energy Monitor ecosystem.

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Hardware RNG, PGP key signing party – London 21/01/2016

Random numberThe BCS OSSG and the OSHUG are hosting a talk on hardware random number generation, plus a PGP key signing party.

The event will be held on Thursday 21st January at BCS HQ – 1st Floor, The Davidson Building, 5 Southampton Street, London, WC2E 7HA, [map] from 6:00pm to 9:00pm.

Note: Please aim to arrive by 18:15 as the event will start at 18:30 prompt.

Hardware random number generation

In this talk we will take a look at what makes a good random number, why you might want a reliable source of them and some methods of generating random numbers in hardware.

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How to Start your Open Source Business

Tariq Rashid

All (almost all) the talks at the Open for Business conference, that was hosted as part of the Wuthering Bytes festival at the end of September, have been recorded and are now available on line.

This includes recordings of the talks by Tariq RashidRob Blake,  Stuart Mackintosh (second talk), Rob TaylorScott Wilson, Amanda Brock Peter CoatesRobin KennedyCornelia Boldyreff and Adam Jollans.

The entire video set is also available as a playlist, allowing you to relive the day in its entirety.

Publishing the talks on-line provides a permanent repository of information that will serve as an invaluable resource to those running, starting up or considering starting, their own open source business.

All the details in the Embecosm web site.


OSS 2016 Call For Contributions

 

The 12th International Conference on Open Source Systems (http://oss2016.org)

Gothenburg, Sweden, 30 May – 02 June 2016

Scope of OSS 2016

Free/Libre Open Source Software (FLOSS) has had a disruptive effect on the software industry and the ways that organizations and individuals create, distribute, acquire and use software and software-based services. The FLOSS movement has created new kinds of opportunities such as the emergence of new business models, knowledge exchange mechanisms, and collective development approaches. On the other hand, the movement has introduced new kinds of challenges, especially as different problem domains embrace openness as a pervasive problem solving strategy. FLOSS can be complex yet widespread and often cross-cultural. Consequently, they require an interdisciplinary understanding of their technical, economic, legal and socio-cultural dynamics.

Many organizations that have been known for developing proprietary software are now actively involved with FLOSS. FLOSS adoption continues to grow among businesses, governments, and other organizations. FLOSS remains important for educators and researchers, as well as an important aspect of e-government and information society initiatives, providing access to high-quality software and the code used to create it.

The goal of 12th International Conference on Open Source Systems, OSS 2016 is to provide an international forum where a diverse community of professionals from academia, industry and public sector, and diverse FLOSS initiatives can come together to share research findings and practical experiences. The conference is also a forum to provide information and education to practitioners, identify directions for further research, and to be an ongoing platform for technology transfer, no matter which form of FLOSS is being pursued.

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Open Source Engine Management System Testing and Adjusting – Poole 19/11/2015

The BCS Dorset Branch, Bournemouth and Poole College and BCS Open Source Specialist Group are hosting a workshop which looks at Open Source and car diagnostics.

The event will be held on 19th November 2015 in Bournemouth and Poole College, North Road Campus, Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Centre, from 7:00pm (7:30pm start).

This event is free to attend for both BCS Members and non-members but booking is required. Places are limited; please book as soon as possible.

Synopsis

Mark ElkinsMark Elkins, a founding member and immediate past Chair of the Open Source SG (OSSG), will give a talk as an Open Source and car mechanics enthusiast by way of bringing these two topics together for car diagnostic (fault finding) purposes.

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Make a Shrimp for Halloween – Worcester 29/10/2015

The BCS Open Source specialist group and the BCS Worcester Branch are hosting a workshop which looks at embedded computing for the public.

The event will be held on the 29th October 2015 in the University of Worcester, Worchester (room to be confirmedEE2021, Elgar Building, St. Johns Campus) from 5:30pm to 8:00pm.

This event is free to attend for both BCS Members and non-members but booking is required. Places are limited; please book as soon as possible.

Make a Shrimp for Halloween – a practical embedded computing workshop

ShrimpThe Shrimp is an incredibly fun, low cost computer that can be built and programmed by just about anyone, in only a few hours and with no prior experience of electronics or programming. Comprising of a simple circuit that is assembled from a handful of components, it can quickly be made to flash LEDs and put to use in exciting projects that have switches, sensors and outputs.

During this workshop participants will first construct the basic Shrimp circuit, before programming it to blink a single LED, and then go onto a more advanced project – such as adding more LEDs and programming it to paint letters in the air with these as it is waved about (using a phenomenon termed persistence of vision). At the end of the evening, teams will demonstrate the fruits of their labours to each other and there may well be some Halloween Treats to share around as a reward!

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Widening Participation in Open Source Communities – London 22/10/2015

This year’s BCS OSSG AGM will be followed by a session on Widening Participation in Open Source Communities.

The event will be held on Thursday 22nd October at BCS HQ – 5 Southampton Street, London, WC2E 7HA from 5:30pm to 8:00pm.

The BCS OSSG AGM  is for BCS OSSG members only – but the following evening event is open to all BCS members and non-members. Booking is required.

The timetable for the evening will be:

  • 17:00 – Registration & refreshments
  • 17:30 – AGM (BCS OSSG members only)
  • 18:00 – Widening Participation talks
  • 20:00 – Sandwiches + Networking

Gender, Representation and Online Participation: A Quantitative Study

Venus symbolOnline communities are flourishing as social meeting web spaces for users and peer community members.

Different online communities require different levels of competence for participants to join, and scattered evidence suggests that females and minorities as participants can be underrepresented. Additional anecdotal evidence suggests that women withdraw from unfriendly online communities.

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