Archives: Events


Open Source in Government

At this evening meeting in London, we’ll be looking at how Open Source is used in Government.

AGENDA
18:00 – Tea, coffee
18:30 – Presentation
20:30 – Close

Please register on Eventbrite for a free ticket. Or, we shall be live streaming via GoToWebinar and recording the talks for later posting on YouTube.

Join via GoToWebinar here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5941389606457776397. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Open Source Excuses – busting the myths

Terence Eden

Why don’t government departments and NHS organisations want to adopt open source? This talk looks at common reasons given. It will give you real life examples of barriers to coding in the open, and practical tips for adopting open source.

Terence Eden is the Head of Open Technology for NHSX. He is a technology & policy expert. He teaches government courses on AI and ethics. He was formerly the UK Government’s representative to the W3C. He speaks around the world on open standards, open source software, and open data.

Current political challenges and opportunities for Open Source in Europe

Astor Nummelin Carlberg

The campaign to save Open Source development from the EU’s Copyright Directive was indicative of the current status of Open Source advocacy in the EU—while ultimately successful, it was more reactive than proactive. The most important lesson from this campaign was that Open Source was not targeted by policy makers, simply forgotten and misunderstood. This suggests that while Open Source has gone mainstream, Open Source advocacy has not kept up.

As there are both more opportunities and regulatory risks for Open Source in the European Union, more, if not all, Open Source community stakeholders need to increase their capacity to deal with policy making. At the least, we need to make sure that Open Source never again becomes an unintended regulatory casualty. There are several very tangible steps that can be taken to do this. Since Open Source is becoming ubiquitous at the same time as there is an eagerness to regulate tech in the EU, the time is now to mature Open Source advocacy and increase its effectiveness.

Astor Nummelin Carlberg is OpenForum Europe’s Policy Director, responsible for policy development and advocacy. Before joining the team he was an Accredited Parliamentary Assistant in the European Parliament, and has studied in the United States and Germany. He has extensive experience of European policy making processes, communications and catalysing networks and communities for advocacy impact.

Making the case for open with Governments

Irina Bolychevsky

Irina Bolychevsky is the founder and director of Redecentralize.org. She’s a digital strategist and expert on data, open data, data platforms, standards, privacy and decentralised technology. She led the ckan open source data platform to international adoption, served on Open Knowledge Foundation’s senior management team and now as a board member and developed the personal data infrastructure programme within the UK’s Government Digital Service. She developed the Smart Dubai’s and UAE federal policy, regulatory, commercial and technical frameworks for data exchange and ran one of the first UK data trust pilots and researched digital identity for the Open Data Institute.


Women in Open Source

After much thought, we have taken the decision to postpone next Thursday’s joint OSSG/BCSWomen meeting “Women in Open Source” because of the on-going effects of the COVID-19 outbreak. We are hoping that we can rearrange this for later in the year. Please watch this page and our Twitter feed for further announcements on a rescheduled date.

At this evening meeting in London, we’ll be welcoming four women, all of whom are pursuing a career in open source. This is a joint meeting with BCS Women.

Please register on Eventbrite for a free ticket. We shall also be livestreaming via GoToMeeting, and later posting the videos on our YouTube channel for those who are unable to make it.

The importance of open standards in addressing Big Tech monopoly power

Irina Bolychevsky

From advocates, politicians and technologists, calls for doing something about big tech grow louder by the day. Yet concrete ideas are few or failing to reach the mainstream. This talk will cover what breaking up big tech would mean and why it’s not enough. Irina will propose an open intervention that will give people a real choice and a way out of controlled walled gardens. Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple are not natural monopolies and we need to regulate them to support competition and alternative business models.

Irina Bolychevsky is the founder and director of Redecentralize.org. She’s a digital strategist and expert on data, open data, data platforms, standards, privacy and decentralised technology. She led the ckan open source data platform to international adoption, served on Open Knowledge Foundation’s senior management team and now as a board member and developed the personal data infrastructure programme within the UK’s Government Digital Service. She developed the Smart Dubai’s and UAE federal policy, regulatory, commercial and technical frameworks for data exchange and ran one of the first UK data trust pilots and researched digital identity for the Open Data Institute.

Modelling and simulating textiles with TexGen

Dr Lousie Brown

This talk will outline the development of the TexGen project, describing its use for modelling various types of textiles and the types of simulations which are run and the mechanical and manufacturing properties which can be predicted using the models. It will look at how it has been advantageous to release the software as open-source rather than taking a more traditional commercialisation route.

Dr Louise Brown is a Senior Research Fellow in the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Nottingham. She currently holds an EPSRC Research Software Engineering Fellowship on Software for Textile Modelling and Simulation. On completion of her PhD, Design of a Filament Winding Cell, she worked for several years in the Computer Science Department at Nottingham working on automated design tools for CAD systems for industrial embroidery machines. She worked from home as a self-employed software engineer for thirteen years before returning to the Composites Research Group at Nottingham in 2009. She is responsible for development of TexGen (http://texgen.sourceforge.net ), open source software for modelling the geometry of textile structures. The software has an increasing user base worldwide with over 41,000 downloads since its initial release in 2006. She has implemented new functionality to include modelling of the complex 3D weaves being used increasingly by the aerospace industry and is involved in research to optimise more complex textile structures.

Collaboration on the Kernel mailing lists

Dawn Foster

While there is quite a bit of data about the people and companies who commit Linux kernel code, there isn’t much data about how people work together on the kernel mailing lists where they decide what patches will be accepted. Using a few of the top subsystem mailing lists as examples, Dawn Foster will share her PhD research into how people collaborate on the kernel mailing lists, including network visualizations of mailing list interactions between contributors. You can expect to learn more about the people, their employers, and other data that impacts how people participate on the mailing lists. For example, do timezones influence collaboration? How about source code contributions? Dawn will also give a brief overview of her 20+ year career both before and after going back to school to get her PhD along with some information about her involvement in OpenUK.

Dawn is an open source strategist and Kubernetes contributor at Pivotal, now part of VMware. She has 20+ years of experience at companies like Intel and Puppet with expertise in community building, strategy, open source software, metrics, and more. She is passionate about bringing people together through a combination of online communities and real-world events along with analyzing the data associated with participation in developer and open source communities. Dawn is on the Governing Board of the Linux Foundation’s CHAOSS project and is a maintainer for several of the working groups. She is also on the board of OpenUK, a UK organisation committed to develop and sustain UK leadership in Open Technology. She holds a PhD from the University of Greenwich along with an MBA and a BS in Computer Science. She has spoken at dozens of industry events, including many Linux Foundation events, OSCON, SXSW, FOSDEM and more.

Towards A More Gender-Inclusive Open Source Community

Dr Becky Faith

Dr. Becky Faith is a Research Fellow and Leader of the Digital and Technology cluster at the Institute of Development Studies at the University of Sussex. Becky’s professional experience and research interests encompass gender and technology, mobile communication studies, human computer interaction and technology for social change.

Becky has fifteen years’ strategic and programme experience working in ICT for development and technology for human rights organisations. She started her career in digital start-ups, working on the UK’s first e-commerce platforms in the 1990s.

Becky will be talking about her research on  ‘Towards A More Gender-Inclusive Open Source Community’; which set out to better understand  why  women are underrepresented and do not always feel welcome or supported in open source communities. She will be talking about what the open source community can do to encourage participation by women around the world; what strategies work best to achieve greater participation? Conformist, reformist or transformist? Do we help women cope with the inequalities they face or do we try and address the transform the unequal power structures that underpin these issues?

 


London Open Source Meetup for RISC-V

This is our quarterly meetup for the London open source community, focusing on RISC-V, hosted by the BCS Open Source Specialist Group and the UK Open Source Hardware User Group.  These meetings provide an opportunity to share the latest ideas around open source in the RISC-V ecosystem, combined with plenty of time for networking. Please discuss, give feedback and suggest future topics on the London Open Source Meetup group event page.

At this evening meeting we have three talks on the MaxineVM on RISC-V, Embench on RISC-V and open source licensing with RISC-V.  One of our speakers, Florin-Gabriel Blanaru, was winner of the inaugural RISC-V Student of the Year competition.  At this meeting he will be presented with his award and then speak about his work. The presentation will be made by Mary Bennett, Chair of the RISC-V Foundation University Outreach committee.

Note. This meeting is at the new BCS London offices, 25 Copthall Ave, EC2R 7BP.

The talks will be live streamed and available on afterwards on the BCS Open Source Specialist Group YouTube channel.

Eventbrite - Open Source SG - London Open Source Meetup for RISC-V

Tea/coffee will be served from 6:00pm, with talks starting at 6:30pm. Each talk will last around 30 minutes and include plenty of time for questions, after which there will be opportunity to network both in the BCS  and later at the Globe pub round the corner.

We shall be livestreaming and recording the talks for later posting on YouTube via GoToWebinar. Registration details to follow shortly.  Please register at:

attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1776873866939508491

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Free and Open Source Licensing and RISC-V

Andrew Katz, @andrewjskatz

Andrew will present the results of his research on the current state of open core licensing, and his thoughts on the direction of travel for licensing in the future. He will also give an update on the CERN Open Hardware licence, and how V2 has been redrafted with the concerns of developers of ASICs and FPGAs.

Andrew Katz, a partner at Moorcrofts LLP, is one of the UK’s leading free and open-source lawyers. He drafted the widely-used solderpad Open Hardware Licence and is on the core legal team for drafting the CERN Open Hardware licence. Andrew is a Fellow of the Free Software Foundation Europe and the Open Forum Academy, and for 7 years held the post of visiting lecturer at Queen Mary, University of London. He is a visiting researcher at the University of Skövde, Sweden where he has co-authored papers whose findings have been adopted into Swedish government policy. 

Andrew qualified as a barrister and was called to the bar (Inner Temple) in 1991, and has now re-qualified and practises as a solicitor in England and Wales. He is also an Irish solicitor (non-practising).

MaxineVM on RISC-V

Florin-Gabriel Blanaru

In this talk we will talk about MaxineVM’s, a metacircular research VM, in relationship to the RISC-V architecture.

A short overview of the current JVM ecosystem on the RISC-V architecture will be presented first.

Next we will proceed with a high level view of MaxineVM along with a description of the work that had to be accomplished for the RISC-V port.

A comparison of MaxineVM’s performance against OpenJDK Zero will follow and we will conclude with a description of our current and future research on safe code modification on architectures without SMC hardware support.

Florin-Gabriel Blanaru is currently a research software engineer at the University of Manchester.  During his bachelor’s degree at the University of Manchester, he successfully ported MaxineVM to the RISC-V architecture. He is interested in all the abstraction layers between the hardware and the programming languages, including computer architecture, operating systems and managed runtime systems. Florin is the inaugural winner of the RISC-V Student of the Year award.

Evaluating RISC-V using the Embench™ 0.5 Benchmark Suite

Jeremy Bennett, @jeremypbennett, @embenchorg

Dhrystone and Coremark have been the defacto standard microcontroller benchmark suites for the last thirty years, but these benchmarks no longer reflect the needs of modern embedded systems. Embench™ was explicitly designed to meet the requirements of modern connected embedded systems. The benchmarks are free, relevant, portable, and well implemented.

In this talk we will present the results of benchmarking RISC-V for various IoT class architectures using Embench. We shall look at what this tells us about the impact of architecture, compilers and libraries on how a system performs, both in terms of code size and code speed.  The aim is not to show which architecture, library or compiler is best, but to gain insight allowing all architectures to be improved.

Dr Jeremy Bennett is Chief Executive of Embecosm, a company based in the UK and Germany providing services developing open source compilers, operating systems and chip models. He is Vice-Chair of the Embench Task Group, and has been one of the main developers of the benchmark infrastructure.  Jeremy is a Fellow of the BCS where he serves as Chair of the Open Source Specialist Group.


Introduction to OAuth and Writing Your Own OAuth Client

This session will outline what OAuth is, why it is important and how to write an OAuth client to an existing web API. Attendees are assumed to have some web development experience.

This is a joint event with the BCS Hampshire Branch, BCS Open Source SG and Solent University. Free and open to both BCS and Non-BCS Members, but please booking required as limited numbers.

One key element of web security is trust. Do you really want to give away your login credentials to any website, without knowing about its security standards? Probably not. OAuth is a protocol which allows users to grant client applications the right to carry out operations on their behalf with larger web services and APIs (providers), without the client application ever knowing their credentials. This is done by the user logging into the provider, which then issues a token to the client app to carry out operations on the user’s behalf. In this way, the client app, which may not have such strong security as the provider, need never know the user’s credentials.

This session will give a high-level overview of how OAuth works and will cover how to develop a web-based OAuth client, with an accompanying hands-on practical exercise.

Attendees are expected to have some server-side web development experience and should have basic command-line skills.

Dr Nick WhiteleggDr. Nick Whitelegg is a senior lecturer in Computing at Southampton Solent University and teaches on a range of undergraduate software development courses including Android and web development. He has contributed software and data to the OpenStreetMap mapping project and has developed an open source mapping site and associated tools for walkers.


Setting Up Your Own OpenStreetMap API

This session will detail how you can use data from the open, crowd-sourced mapping project OpenStreetMap to populate your own database and write your own simple API. Attendees are assumed to have some web development experience.

This is a joint event with the BCS Hampshire Branch, BCS Open Source SG and Solent University.

Free and open to both BCS and Non-BCS Members, but please booking essential as limited numbers via nick.whitelegg@solent.ac.uk.

OpenStreetMap (OSM) is an international, crowd-sourced project to map the entire world. Volunteers contribute to the map by walking, cycling or driving along paths and roads with GPS devices, or tracing outlines of buildings and landscape features from aerial imagery. The really powerful thing, however, about OSM is the data itself – which is free and open and available for use by third-party applications. This practical session will provide a brief introduction to OSM and demonstrate how you can set up your own database with OSM data and write a simple web API to query the database.

Attendees are expected to have some server-side web development experience and should have basic command-line skills.

Dr Nick WhiteleggDr Nick Whitelegg is a senior lecturer in Computing (Web Development) at Southampton Solent University and teaches on a range of undergraduate software development courses including Android and web development. He has contributed software and data to the OpenStreetMap mapping project and has developed an open source mapping site and associated tools for walkers.


Modern Languages

During this evening, held jointly with OSHUG, we look at the latest in open source programming languages. Three talks from three highly respected speakers

Note. We are in the new BCS London offices at 25 Copthall Ave  EC2R 7BP.

Eventbrite - Open Source SG

Tea/coffee will be served from 6:00pm, with the talks from 6:30pm. Each talk will last around 30 to 45 minutes including any questions.

We shall be livestreaming and recording the talks for later posting on YouTube via GoToWebinar. Please register at:

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2652791007348976652

An introduction to Perl6

Simon Proctor

An introduction to the newest version of Perl with an emphasis on some neat features.

With 17 years as a professional web developer (in a range of languages) and over 30 years of doing it for fun Simon Proctor has just about started to understand what he’s doing. He’s on occasion been known to take things seriously.

Julia – A fresh approach to numerical computing

Avik Sengupta

In this talk, Avik will demonstrate how Julia combines dynamic, high level source with a high performance runtime code. He will show what makes Julia unique among programming languages, and how it enables high quality numeric computing libraries. He will survey the machine learning / deep learning ecosystem in Julia, and talk about how that can be extended to new kinds of modelling using differentiable programming. The talk will begin as an introduction to the language, and finish by showing how it opens up new paradigms of computing.

Julia is the fastest high performance open source computing language for data, analytics, algorithmic trading, machine learning, artificial intelligence, and many other fields. Julia solves the two language problem by combining the ease of use of Python and R with the speed of C++.

Avik Sengupta is the head of product development and software engineering at Julia Computing, contributor to open source Julia and maintainer of several Julia packages. Avik is the author of Julia High Performance, co-founder of two artificial intelligence start-ups in the financial services sector and creator of large complex trading systems for the world’s leading investment banks. Prior to Julia Computing, Avik was co-founder and CTO at AlgoCircle and at Itellix, director at Lab49 and head of algorithmic solutions at Decimal Point Analytics. Avik earned his MS in Computational Finance at Carnegie Mellon and MBA Finance at the Indian Institute of Management in Bangalore.

Evolving Languages: 5 Steps to Go

Charles Forsyth

Go is the latest of a sequence of closely related concurrent programming languages: Squeak, Newsqueak, Alef, Limbo and Go. Each one strictly followed its predecessor, they occupy a similar space (CSP-inspired concurrent languages), and all but Squeak have a vaguely similar syntax, perhaps suggesting gradual refinement and incremental evolution. I take a closer look, revealing their significant differences, especially in in type systems and run-time environments, reflecting the effect of different design choices to satisfy the requirements of a larger, surrounding system.

Dr Charles Forsyth is a founder and Technical Director of Vita Nuova, which specialises in systems software and distributed systems.

He is interested in compilers, operating systems, networking (protocols and services), security, and distributed systems and algorithms. He specialises in the design and implementation of systems software, from low-level drivers through compilers to whole operating systems. He has published papers on operating systems, Ada compilation, worst-case execution analysers for safety-critical applications, “resources as files”, and the development of computational grids.


London Open Source Meetup for RISC-V

This is our quarterly meetup for the London open source community, focusing on RISC-V, hosted by the BCS Open Source Specialist Group and the UK Open Source Hardware User Group.  These meetings provide an opportunity to share the latest ideas around open source in the RISC-V ecosystem, combined with plenty of time for networking. Please discuss, give feedback and suggest future topics on the London Open Source Meetup group event page.

Note. This meeting is at the new BCS London offices, 25 Copthall Ave, EC2R 7BP.

At this evening meeting we have three talks on the CHIPS alliance, a comparative analysis of the RISC-V ecosystem and a look at RISC-V in education.  The talks will be live streamed and available on afterwards on the BCS Open Source Specialist Group YouTube channel.

Eventbrite - Open Source SG - London Open Source Meetup for RISC-V

Tea/coffee will be served from 6:00pm, with talks starting at 6:30pm. Each talk will last 20-30 minutes and include plenty of time for questions, after which there will be opportunity to network both in the BCS  and later at the Globe pub round the corner.

We shall be livestreaming and recording the talks for later posting on YouTube via GoToWebinar.  Please register at:

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2236026621826907405

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Chips Alliance Project

Dr Zvonimir Z. Bandić, @zbandic

We have recently launched a CHIPS Alliance project: CHIPS (Common Hardware for Interfaces, Processors and Systems) Alliance harnesses the energy of open source collaboration to accelerate hardware development. The organization was created to host and curate high-quality, open source hardware design relevant to the design of silicon devices. By creating a neutral and collaborative environment, CHIPS Alliance intends to share resources to lower the cost of development and accelerate the creation of more efficient and innovative chip designs – covering the span from small IoT devices to large datacenter silicon solutions.

As an independent entity, companies and individuals can work together and contribute resources to help make open source chips, complex IP blocks and system-on-a-chip (SoC) design more accessible to the market.

We will describe our initial projects, which are SweRV core – high performance, 9-stage, dual issue, 32 bit superscalar RISC-V core, associated instruction set simulator, Universal Verification Methodology (UVM)-Based Stream Generator Environment for RISC-V Cores, that provides configurable, highly stressful instruction sequences that can verify architectural and micro-architectural corner-cases of designs, OmniXtend cache-coherence over ethernet interconnect protocol, FuseSOC package manager, Verilator RTL simulator, cocotb design verification and several others.

Zvonimir Z. Bandić is the Research Staff Member and Senior Director of Next Generation Platform Technologies Department in a Western Digital Corporation in San Jose, California. He received his BS in electrical engineering in 1994 from the University of Belgrade, Yugoslavia, and his MS (1995) and PhD (1999) in applied physics from Caltech, Pasadena, in the field of novel electronic devices based on wide bandgap semiconductors. He is currently focusing on emerging Non-Volatile Memories (PCM, ReRAM, MRAM) applications for data center distributed computing, including RISC-V based CPU technologies , in-memory compute, RDMA networking, and machine learning hardware acceleration. He has been awarded over 50 patents in the fields of solid state electronics, solid state disk controller technology, security architecture and storage systems and has published over 50 peer-reviewed papers. Zvonimir is Chairman of CHIPS Alliance, Chair of OpenCAPI org, and Board of Directors member of RISC-V standards organization.

Open Source Hardware meets Open Source Software

George Grey, @gcgrey

The RISC-V architecture spans 32 bit micro-controllers to 128 bit advanced multi-core SoCs. The free and open ISA encourages and accelerates innovation and differentiation in hardware design. However, a large part of the cost of ISA support is the delivery and evolution of a software ecosystem. Software fragmentation has historically been a significant industry challenge. This is particularly true in the IoT, embedded and Edge device markets, where there is an unlimited range of different hardware configurations and use cases. This talk will discuss different paths to development of the RISC-V software ecosystem in a world where billions of devices are now being connected, requiring universal standards for IoT to Cloud end to end applications, including security and over the air updates for every device.

George is CEO of Foundries.io. He was previously CEO of Linaro Ltd, leading open source software collaboration in the Arm ecosystem for the last 8 years. Prior to joining Linaro, George led software and hardware technology companies for over 25 years, gaining wide ranging expertise in business strategy, product development, sales and marketing. He has built a reputation for leading and growing technology companies, and brings extensive experience in creating innovative products and solutions for global markets to Foundries.io. George holds a degree in Electrical Sciences from Cambridge University and currently resides in Cambridge, UK.

Ripes: Teaching computer architecture through visualization

Morten Borup Petersen

The presentation will provide an overview of typical topics covered in an introductory computer architecture course to motivate the use of visual tools in teaching.

We will then take a look at Ripes, an application for visually simulating a 5-stage pipeline implementing the RISC-V instruction set.

Besides simulation, the main purpose of Ripes is to visualize the implications of control- and data hazards on the processor microarchitecture.

Find the source code for Ripes at: https://github.com/mortbopet/Ripes

Morten is at the EPFL, Switzerland, specializing in computer engineering and embedded systems. He is the author of Ripes, an open-source application for teaching computer architecture through
visualization, using the RISC-V instruction set.  He has previously interned at Arm Cambridge as well as published research on computer architecture at the NorCAS and ARCS conferences.


Lightning talks and AGM

This evening event starts with the BCS Open Source Specialist Group AGM, and is then followed by our lightning talk evening. We introduced this last year, and the event, with talks ranging from open source water jet surfing to open source sous vide cooking was very popular, so we are repeating this year.  The event is not yet full, so if you would like 10 minutes to talk about your pet project, please ask!

Note. We are in the new BCS London offices at 25 Copthall Ave  EC2R 7BP.

Eventbrite - Open Source SG - London Open Source Meetup for RISC-V

Tea/coffee will be served from 6:00pm, with the AGM starting at 6:30pm and lightning talks from 6:50pm. Each talk will last no more than 10 minutes including any questions.

We shall be livestreaming and recording the talks for later posting on YouTube via GoToWebinar.  Please register at:

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5699229864088817933

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

AGM

Everyone is welcome to attend, but only BCS members may vote. We will have the brief reports on the past year’s activities and then elect a new committee. Note: non-BCS members may stand for all committee posts except Chair, Treasurer and Membership secretary. So far we have the following nominations, but more are encouraged.

  • Chair: Jeremy Bennett
  • Treasurer: Richard Miller
  • Membership secretary: Julian Kunkel
  • Secretary: Cornelia Boldyref
  • Web supremo: Simon Worthington
  • Events sub-committee: Andy Bennett, Sevan Janyan
  • Advocacy and outreach: This is planned to be combined with the membership secretary role.
  • Young Professional/Student representative: No nominations
  • Committee members: No nominations

We depend on an active committee to put on all our events and drive our advocacy and outreach work. Please consider putting yourself forward.

Embedded Facial Recognition on Edge TPU

Pietra F T Madio

Google recently released a new development board for edge computation on embedded devices. For my project I implemented a facial recognition system on their device using Tensorflow. In this talk I’m presenting some of the challenges I faced, the limitations of the board and how we were able to overcome them.

Pietra is a college student at Brockenhurst College and an AI Research Engineer for Embecosm.

The Open Source Satellite Programme

Paul Madle

Over the last 25 years, the UK has brought positive disruptions to the space industry. The University of Surrey innovated small spacecraft: leveraging Commercial-Off-The-Shelf components that could compete with larger more traditionally designed spacecraft. In the last 7 years, Scottish CubeSats (very small satellites) have grown from academic projects into commercially viable products performing earth observation and other applications. Both of these innovations have brought down costs and made space more accessible to greater numbers of people. KIPSE Space Systems aspires to be a catalyst for the next step-change to the industry by collaboratively designing a new, capable spacecraft platform that is open source, all design being freely accessible through the internet.

Paul Madle has 20 years’ experience as a systems/software engineer within the Aerospace, Finance & Web sectors. His code runs on the most critical on board systems for some of the UK’s most significant spacecraft projects. He is very keen to share his knowledge with the next generation of engineers and runs code clubs that have successfully transitioned young people with few qualifications into capable software engineers who now work within the industry.

It’s Open Source, not gratis binaries

Sevan Janiyan, @sevonroad

Sevan is the founder of Venture37, which offers consultancy around the fundemental building blocks of IT systems such as DNS, email, HTTP, firewalls or routing running on UNIX & alike systems. He is an active supporter OpenBSD, NetBSD, FreeBSD and CoovaChilli.

Intel 8080 microprocessor on an FPGA

Maxim Blinov

The Intel 8080 microprocessor was one of the first widely available general-purpose microprocessors. Given its historic significance and relatively straightforward ISA, I implemented a binary compatible softcore variant using VHDL, targeting the Artix7 100T FPGA. Accompanying the softcore CPU is a PS2 keyboard controller, VGA text buffer, and 7-segment display driver. These components are accessible from the 8080 through memory mapping, which is realized by a central memory access controller. Hence, software can read scan codes from the keyboard controller, and writes text to the VGA terminal, which is enough for a simplistic but nonetheless curious software platform.

The hardware description source can be found at https://github.com/mablinov/intel-8080.

Maxim is currently working at Embecosm, helping to develop and support open-source GCC-based toolchains. His last major work was to benchmark and debug the experimental GCC support for the draft RISC-V bitmanip ISA extension, using both software simulation and verilated IP cores.

Maxim is also interested in FPGA hardware design, and embedded software development.

Making with BlackEdge

Al Wood, @folknology

Using the BlackEdge standard to build the new BlackIceMx, eating our own dog food.

Al  is an engineer of opensource hardware & software, practitioner of robotics, electronics & 3D Printers and tutor of ML, FPGA & Verilog. Bit wrangler in C, Erlang & Python.

Title to be announced

Andy Bennett, @databasescaling

Andy Bennett is founder of Register Dynamics and inhabits the void between hardware, software and users. He serves on the BCS Open Source SG committee as one of our event coordinators.

More talks to follow…